News

May
18
2016

See how you can find out who died in your house | fox8.com

See how you can find out who died in your house | fox8.com

May 16, 2016 - Suzanne Stratford

FAIRLAWN, Ohio - When renting or buying a home people are quick to question the costs, condition of the property, crime rate and school system, but there is another factor that can impact the bottom line.

A violent death occurring inside of a house can reduce the property value by 25% according to real estate experts and often nearly double the time needed to sell it.

“They’re considered stigmatized homes,” said Jeff Fox, a V.P. with Stouffer Reality in Fairlawn, “Like violent occurrences, it could be a death, maybe even suicide, or may even be a sexual predator.”

Read More »
Mar
28
2016

This Website Can Tell You If Someone Died In Your House - FORBES

This Website Can Tell You If Someone Died In Your House
BY Natalie Sportelli FORBES Staff Reporter

If you could find out if someone died in your house, would you want to know? Founded in 2013 by software engineer Roy Condrey, DiedInHouse.com allows users to search an address to see if it had a dark former life (or even accommodates the afterlife). From murders and suicides to meth activity and arson, DiedInHouse uses data from over 130 million police records, news reports, old death certificates and more to determine if your house has seen horrors.

The website’s creation begins like a ghost story. Three years ago, Condrey received a text message in the middle of the night from one of his tenants that read: “Did you know that your house is haunted?” Condrey went down a cyber rabbit hole seeking, but not finding, an easy way to determine if his property had indeed seen a gruesome crime or fatality.

“I went online to find a ‘Carfax’ of sorts for deaths in homes and I didn’t find anything, but I did find pages and pages of people asking if there’s a way to find out if their house is haunted,” says Condrey, who rents his a number of his properties. He later learned through his data collection that, in fact, at least 4.5 million homes nationwide have had documented deaths take place on the premises. The number of homeowners that know about the history of their home is unknown.

Read More »
Mar
27
2016

Want to Know If Someone Died in Your Home? There’s a Site for That - Realtor.com

Want to Know If Someone Died in Your Home? There’s a Site for That - Realtor.com

By Lisa Davis Realtor.com 10/26/2015

Your disclosure form and home inspection reveal plenty about the house you’re buying. Oops, there is lead paint. Darn, termites have indeed been gnawing at the cedar siding. Yes, that is a hairline crack you see in the foundation.

But there’s one thing you may not glean: whether or not someone passed away in your home. California law requires owners to disclose if a death occurred on the premises—but only if it was within the previous three years.

Luckily, there’s a website that can tell you.

DiedinHouse.com “is the first of its kind, web-based service that helps you find out if anyone has died at any valid U.S. address,” the site claims.

Read More »
Mar
27
2016

Blood and Real Estate: O.J. Simpson, Murder, and Property Values

Blood and Real Estate: O.J. Simpson, Murder, and Property Values

By Yuqing Pan | Realtor.com | February 1, 2016 - 3:30 pm ET

Nicole Brown Simpson’s former residence / AP Photo/Eric Draper

Nicole Brown Simpson bought the condominium in Brentwood, an upscale neighborhood of Los Angeles, for $625,000 in January 1994, five months before her death. After the brutal murders, the property sat on the market for two years before being sold for $525,000, according to public record. After an extensive remodeling—and a clever address change—the house sold again in 2006, for $1.72 million.

Forgive our morbid curiosity, but we couldn’t help wonder: What effect does a gruesome and terrible crime such as murder have on a property’s longtime value? Is a home forever tarnished? Or can the stigma be cleaned away, especially in less notorious cases?

Read More »
Mar
27
2016

This Startup Tracks America’s Murder Houses - Bloomberg Business

This Startup Tracks America’s Murder Houses

By Patrick Clark - Bloomberg Business

Roy Condrey's journey to becoming an expert on murder houses began with a dying air conditioner.

After he replaced a faulty AC unit at a rental property he owns in Irmo, S.C., the tenant told him she thought the house was haunted. On a whim, he searched the Internet for a website that would reveal if there had been a death in the house. “I was looking for a Carfax for homes,” he said, referring to the service that supplies vehicle history reports to used-car buyers. “Instead, I found pages and pages of Google search results asking the question ‘How do I find out if my house is haunted?’ ”

Two years ago, Condrey launched DiedInHouse, a website that allows customers to find out if someone died at a specific address and the cause of death. Using news reports, obituaries, and some search juju Condrey prefers not to disclose, his company has built a database of 4.5 million houses that were the sites of confirmed deaths.

Read More »