News

Aug
1
2015

The weird world of home-sale clauses - The Washington Post

By Michele Lerner July 31

Maybe some Virginia lawmakers have watched too many episodes of “Breaking Bad.”

Home buyers in Virginia now have one more request they can make of sellers: to disclose whether the property has ever been used to manufacture methamphetamine, and, if so, whether the property has been appropriately cleaned up.

“So far I haven’t come across anyone who has actually used this new meth lab disclosure form, but it [went] into effect July 1, and we’ll have to see if anyone makes an offer contingent on a promise to clean up a drug lab,” said Morgan Knull, an associate broker with Re/Max Gateway in Washington.

Ned Rich, managing broker of McEnearney Associates in Washington, said in the white-hot D.C. market, most buyers are eliminating as many contingencies as possible on their contracts. In some cases, it’s the sellers who add contingencies to their counteroffers.

“At least in the city, it’s somewhat common to have a contract without even a finance, appraisal or termite contingency,” Rich said. “Some sellers ask for a contract contingency of their own — to live in their home rent-free after settlement for a certain period of time.”

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Jun
19
2015

DiedinHouse.com Reports Now Include Past Fire Related Incidents

All DiedinHouse.com Reports Now Include Past Fire Related Incidents, as well as Reported Meth Activity, A List of Names Associated to the Address and Records of Death Occurrences! Before You Buy a Home, Get Informed About Everything! Use DiedinHouse.com to Learn the History of the House. 

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Apr
17
2015

Did Someone Die in Your Home? Find Out With DiedInHouse - Aftermath

Did Someone Die in Your Home? Find Out With DiedInHouse

By Aftermath Trauma Cleaning & Biohazard Removal Specialists April 17, 2015

Maybe you’ve seen the trailer for the new Poltergeist movie and noticed at the end a web address for a company called DiedinHouse. While some consider the concept morbid, knowing whether or not someone may have died in your home can do more than just provide peace of mind. It can also give potential buyers leverage in a sale, notify them of a possible stigmatized property, and help current home owners make wise decisions about biohazard cleanup.

The DiedinHouse service is easy to use, and most results are returned within minutes. Data is available for homes in all 50 states. Customers simply input their address on the main site, and for $11.99, they receive a report that includes details of deaths or meth-related activity having occurred in the home. It also includes a list of the home’s former occupants, and any additional findings are sent to the customer for a 30 day period. Those who are searching for a home have the option of purchasing packages that include several searches, which can save them money if they intend to check multiple properties.

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Apr
9
2015

Are You Living In A Former Meth House?

Are You Living In A Former Meth House?

By Kristy Hessman is the Lead Writer for @HotPads @Zillow and is a renting and moving expert, having lived in 19 rentals in seven cities across the U.S.

No matter how safe Walter White may have made the cooking of meth look on Breaking Bad, the real life process is dangerous and potentially deadly, even to those not directly involved.

“Chemicals such as acetone, phosphine, hydrochloric acid, lye, sulfuric acid and ammonia are all released into the home during the cooking process,” said Jeremy Shelton, a Certified Microbial Consultant who routinely tests homes across America’s Southeast for exposure. “The chemicals used are extremely dangerous and can cause serious respiratory problems, cancer, and in some cases death.”

Unfortunately, state regulations vary when it comes to the requirements of disclosing the history of former meth houses, as well as the clean up of such homes, so those buying or renting in a residence formerly used as a meth lab might never know about its past.

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Mar
30
2015

Five Ways To Find Out if Someone Died in Your Home

Five Ways To Find Out if Someone Died in Your Home

Written by ballengroup on Friday, 20 March 2015
By Las Vegas Lori

United States homebuyers are a superstitious lot. Most are spooked by the thought of buying a former crime scene and few will touch a house tainted by death, no matter how innocent the circumstances. Anecdotally “stigmatized properties,” as the National Association of Realtors calls them, linger on the market a full 45 percent longer than homes that are not psychologically impacted by death.

The problem is, in most states, a homeowner does not have to disclose a death in the propertyhe is selling. This can lead to a buyer unwittingly buying a home that he would have avoided like the plague, given the full facts. Luckily there are some things you can do to uncover a home’s history for yourself. Now, who you gonna call?

#1: Review the Seller Disclosure Form
Most states require sellers to disclose important information about theproperty to potential homebuyers before closing. Sellers routinely make these disclosures on a pre-printed disclosure form that asks all sorts of questions about the condition of the property, such as whether it has suffered any water leaks or pest infestation. The idea is to get sellers to disclose any “material facts” about the home. A “material fact” is anything that might influence the purchaser’s decision to buy.

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