News

Jan
5
2017

Does your house have a secret? New website can reveal answer.

Does your house have a secret? New website can reveal answer.
Website DiedinHouse.com can reveal home's past

By Bill Spencer - Investigative Reporter - KPRC 2
January 05, 2017

HOUSTON - Many Houston-area homes are hiding dark, horrific secrets.

On some properties, gruesome crimes have been committed. Some you’ve heard about and some you have not.

At 942 Beachcomber Lane, in Houston, Andrea Yates drowned her five children in the family bath tub.

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Oct
30
2016

This Website Can Tell You If Someone Died In Your House - Forbes

This Website Can Tell You If Someone Died In Your House - Forbes
By Natalie Sportelli FORBES Staff Reporter

http://www.forbes.com/sites/nataliesportelli/2015/10/26/this-website-can-tell-you-if-someone-died-in-your-house/#71a16ab54153

If you could find out if someone died in your house, would you want to know? Founded in 2013 by software engineer Roy Condrey, DiedInHouse.com allows users to search an address to see if it had a dark former life (or even accommodates the afterlife). From murders and suicides to meth activity and arson, DiedInHouse uses data from over 130 million police records, news reports, old death certificates and more to determine if your house has seen horrors.

The website’s creation begins like a ghost story. Three years ago, Condrey received a text message in the middle of the night from one of his tenants that read: “Did you know that your house is haunted?” Condrey went down a cyber rabbit hole seeking, but not finding, an easy way to determine if his property had indeed seen a gruesome crime or fatality.

“I went online to find a ‘Carfax’ of sorts for deaths in homes and I didn’t find anything, but I did find pages and pages of people asking if there’s a way to find out if their house is haunted,” says Condrey, who rents his a number of his properties. He later learned through his data collection that, in fact, at least 4.5 million homes nationwide have had documented deaths take place on the premises. The number of homeowners that know about the history of their home is unknown.

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Oct
24
2016

Did someone die in your house? DiedInHouse.com will tell you, for a fee

Did someone die in your house? DiedInHouse.com will tell you, for a fee

By Phil Demers | MassLive.com

October 24, 2016 at 2:34 PM, updated October 24, 2016 at 3:44 PM

The main page entry bar simply says, "See what DiedInHouse can do for you," asking for an address or apartment number.

Punch in yours and wire the site $12 and you could shortly find yourself looking over a report of all the dicey happenings — murders, suicides, natural deaths, felonies, fires, floods, even drug activity — that may have occurred where you stand.

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Oct
24
2016

Moving Because Your House is Haunted? You Are Not Alone

Moving Because Your House is Haunted? You Are Not Alone

By Jay MacDonald on October 24, 2016 | SpareFoot Blog

Brad Warner knew all about the history of the haunted Morgan Mansion when he and his wife bought the century-old former mortuary and inn in Dunsmuir, CA at auction back in 2010.

In fact, it was precisely its paranormal pedigree that made the four-story, 9,000-square-foot home, complete with chapel and vintage embalming room, ripe for a remodel into a haunted “dead and breakfast,” all the rage with aficionados of the “dark tourism” craze. Did I mention the casket in the basement with the skeletal remains of a 17-year-old girl?

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Oct
17
2016

8 Crucial Real Estate Lessons We Learned From 'American Horror Story'

8 Crucial Real Estate Lessons We Learned From 'American Horror Story'
By Holly Amaya | Oct 17, 2016

You may think “American Horror Story” (currently in its sixth season) is a creepy anthology show about ghosts, vampires, serial killers, witches, homicidal clowns, freaks, Nazis, aliens, backwoods cannibals, piggy men, and Lady Gaga. But do you want to hear something really scary? At its core, AHS is actually all about real estate.

Every season is richly connected to a definitive sense of place—a Los Angeles Tudor, a stately New Orleans manse, an aging Art Deco hotel—that confines whatever rambling and downright freaky plot twists the show’s creators, Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, decide to fling sadistically at viewers each week.

With the show’s latest and most insane iteration (“Roanoke”) well under way, we couldn’t help but think: There must be some take-home real estate lessons in this sweeping melange of camp and gore. So we binge-watched all six seasons to uncover some bloody good housing lessons for you, dear reader. (Warning: past season spoilers ahead.) So yeah, we’re never, never sleeping again. You’re welcome!

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